American Sociological Association

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  1. Too Many or Too Few PhDs? Employment Opportunities in Academic Sociology

    Using data from positions advertised in the ASA Job Bank, this research brief describes the types of jobs available to sociologists in 2006, and describes the leading areas of specialization sought in advertised assistant professor positions.

  2. IDEALISTS VS. CAREERISTS: Graduate School Choices of Sociology Majors

    The focus of this research brief is on those 2005 sociology gradates who continued on to graduate school directly after graduation. This brief explores how the sociology major is useful for graduate study in both applied programs as well as the liberal arts and sciences.

  3. What Can I Do with a Master's in Sociology? The Department as Context

    Sociology departments provided data about the characteristics of their master's programs in a 2009 survey conducted by the ASA research department. Results from that survey, including a comparison of 'traditional' versus 'applied' program characteristics, are presented in this brief.

  4. Paying Attention to the Master’s Degree in Sociology

    An ASA taskforce was appointed to find out ways that sociology departments can strengthen their master's programs as the number of degrees awarded declined by about 13 percent by 2006. This research brief looks at characteristics of master's students, including their reasons for pursuing this degree, what they learned and how satisfied they were with their programs, and how they paid for their education.

  5. The Concerns of Student Protesters and What Sociology Has to Offer

    Causes of Protests and Student Demands

    At the root of some student complaints are worries over representation, campus climate, and a nagging sense of the failure of diversity policies to address issues of structural inequality. A large body of sociological research on diversity and affirmative action in higher education lends credence to student complaints about a lack of representation. According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, faculty of color remain underrepresented.

  6. Those Who Can Teach

    TRAILSBell hooks once said “The classroom remains the most radical space of possibility in the academy.” If this is true, then the emphasis would have to be placed on the word possibility.

  7. Sections Collaborate to Explore Disability as an Overlooked Axis of Intersectionality and Inequality

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, approximately 19 percent of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States lives with disability. As baby boomers age and live longer, the percentage continues to increase and is already larger than that of many of the racial and ethnic groups that we as sociologists intensively study. Yet, disability has often been overlooked in scholarship on inequality and intersectionality.

  8. On the Value of Diversity in Higher Education

    On April 22, 2016, the Tennessee legislature voted to cut all state appropriations for the Office of Equity and Diversity at the state’s flagship university. This move came as a blow to a university struggling to create a more welcoming gender, religious, and racial environment for students, faculty, and staff in Central Appalachia—a region with a long history of intolerance. Since the April decision, students, faculty, and staff at the University of Tennessee have repeatedly rallied in protest.

  9. FAD Grant

    Application Deadlines: June 15 & December 15

  10. Invited Sessions Proposals Solicited for the 2018 Annual Meeting

    The substantive program for the 2018 Annual Meeting continues to develop under the leadership of President-Elect Eduardo Bonilla-Silva and the 2018 Program Committee. The meeting’s theme of “Feeling Race: An Invitation to Explore Racialized Emotions” invites participation across the discipline and provides many opportunities to bring together a variety of sociological work in diverse program formats.