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  1. Accepting a Job Below One's Skill Level Can Adversely Affect Future Employment Prospects

    Accepting a job below one's skill level can be severely penalizing when applying for future employment because of the perception that someone who does this is less committed or less competent, according to new research from a sociologist at The University of Texas at Austin.

  2. People More Likely to Cheat as They Become More Economically Dependent on Their Spouses

    Both men and women are more likely to cheat on their spouses the more economically dependent they are on them, according to a new study.

    "You would think that people would not want to 'bite the hand that feeds them' so to speak, but that is not what my research shows," said study author Christin L. Munsch, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Connecticut. "Instead, the findings indicate people like feeling relatively equal in their relationships. People don't like to feel dependent on another person."

  3. Study Reveals Why Men Receive Much More Media Coverage Than Women

    For years social scientists have grappled with the question of why men receive far more media coverage than women, and now a new study reveals the answer.

  4. Sociologists to Explore the Topic of Sexuality at Annual Meeting in Chicago

    More than 5,500 sociologists will convene in Chicago this August to explore ideas and scientific research relating to sexuality and many other topics, as part of the American Sociological Association's 110th Annual Meeting. This year's theme, "Sexualities in the Social World," shows the importance of research by sociologists in illuminating how social norms and social inequalities affect what sexual behavior is acceptable and who partners with whom. 

  5. Harvard Professor Elected President of the American Sociological Association

    Michèle Lamont, a Professor of Sociology and African and African-American Studies and the Robert I. Goldman Professor of European Studies at Harvard University, has been elected the 108th President of the American Sociological Association (ASA). Lamont will serve as President-Elect for one year before succeeding the City University of New York Graduate Center's Ruth Milkman as ASA President in August 2016.

  6. American Sociological Association Names Nancy Weinberg Kidd New Executive Officer

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) announced today that Nancy Weinberg Kidd will succeed the retiring Sally T. Hillsman as the Association's executive officer in September.

    Kidd, who earned a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University and a B.A. in sociology from the University of Pennsylvania, is currently the executive director of the National Communication Association (NCA) in Washington, D.C.

  7. American Sociological Association Launches New Open Access Journal, Socius

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) has launched Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World, a new open access journal, which published its inaugural articles earlier this month.

    A first of its kind for the ASA, the journal is free to anyone, appears online only, and can feature scholarly papers on any sociology-related topic.

  8. Notre Dame Sociologists to Lead American Sociological Association's Flagship Journal

    The American Sociological Association (ASA) announced this week that it has appointed three sociologists from the University of Notre Dame to serve as the next editors of the American Sociological Review (ASR), the association's flagship journal. Omar Lizardo, Rory McVeigh, and Sarah Mustillo will begin their three-year term in January 2016.

  9. Polygamy and Alcohol Linked to Physical Abuse in African Marriages

    African women in polygamous marriages or with alcoholic husbands have a significantly higher risk of being physically abused by their husbands than women in monogamous marriages or women whose husbands don't abuse alcohol, new research shows.

  10. Pressure to 'Publish or Perish' May Discourage Innovative Research, Study Suggests

    The traditional pressure in academia for faculty to "publish or perish" advances knowledge in established areas. But it also might discourage scientists from asking the innovative questions that are most likely to lead to the biggest breakthroughs, according to a new study spearheaded by a UCLA professor.