American Sociological Association

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  1. Sociologists Receive ASA Funding to Study Impact of Laws Permitting Concealed Weapons on College Campuses

    If you are a student at a public college or university in Arkansas, Colorado, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi, Oregon, Texas, Utah, or Wisconsin, the person sitting next to you in class may legally have a handgun under that collegiate sweatshirt he or she is wearing. In these 10 states, legislation allows students and faculty members who have concealed weapon licenses to bring their weapons, such as handguns, to campus. In 2014, bills proposing similar legislation were introduced in 14 states.

  2. “This is an Italian Church with a Large Hispanic Population”: Factors and Strategies in White Ethno-Religious Place Making

    This paper examines how a group of white ethnic, mostly Italian American, Catholics participate in ethno-religious place making in a predominantly Latino church. In light of a growing number of Latino parishioners, white ethnic church members engage in place making activities to ascribe a white ethno-religious identity to place. Drawing on participant observations, interviews, and archival documents, I examine the impetus behind, and strategies used, in making ethno-religious place. I find that place attachment and group threat drive white ethnics to make place.

  3. Enchanting Self-discipline: Methodical Reflexivity and the Search for the Supernatural in Charismatic Christian Testimonial Practice

    Social science has long operated under the assumption that enchantment, seeking out this-worldly manifestations of the supernatural, impedes the cultivation of self-discipline. How, then, to account for a Christian brotherhood whose testimonial practice is at once enchanting and disciplining of the self?
  4. Rupture and Rhythm: A Phenomenology of National Experiences

    This article investigates how people make sense of ruptures in the flow of everyday life as they enter new experiential domains. Shifts in being-in-time create breaks in the natural attitude that offer the opportunity to register national—or, for example, religious, gender, or class—experiences. People interpret ruptures in perception and proprioception by drawing connections with domains in which similar or contrasting kinds of disruption are evident.
  5. Film Review: My So-called Enemy

    My So-called Enemy, directed by Lisa Gossels, follows six Palestinian and Israeli teenage girls over a period of seven years (2002–2009). These women participated in a woman’s leadership program called Building Bridges for Peace back in 2002. The girls come from various religious backgrounds and have varying experiences of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The girls, who live only a few hours from each other in the Middle East, travel to Bridgeton, New Jersey, to rediscover the humanity of their “enemy” and learn about the narrative(s) of the “other” in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.
  6. Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010

    Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010
  7. American Religion, All or Nothing at All

    Most Contexts readers will know that in recent years Americans became less attached to organized religion. The 2016 General Social Survey (GSS) estimated that 22% of adults preferred no religion, up from 21% in 2014, 14% in 2004, 9% in 1994, and 7% in both 1984 and 1974. This strong trend invites the inference that American religion is declining rapidly. But no single trend can give a complete view of a complicated institution. The rise of the “nones” is interesting, in part, because it is the most extreme evidence of religious decline in the United States.

  8. Traditional, Modern, and Post-Secular Perspectives on Science and Religion in the United States

    Using General Social Survey data, we examine perspectives on science and religion in the United States. Latent class analysis reveals three groups based on knowledge and attitudes about science, religiosity, and preferences for certain religious interpretations of the world. The traditional perspective (43 percent) is marked by a preference for religion compared to science; the modern perspective (36 percent) holds the opposite view. A third perspective, which we call post-secular (21 percent), views both science and religion favorably.

  9. Marrying Social Activism and Spiritual Seeking

    Eve Fox speaks with Elizabeth Lesser about founding a prominent center for holistic learning.

  10. Committing Mass Violence to Education and Learning

    Laura E. Agnich and Meghan Hale on the rational, if overblown, fears reconfiguring classrooms.